10th floor ghost girl

seifukucat:

it’s very important that i am both cute and powerful

(via onehundreddollars)

"The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything."
- Scott Wood (X)

(Source: luvyourselfsomeesteem, via browngurlwfro)

nebulasnovasandnightsky:

look if you unironically say ‘money can’t buy happiness’ then either you’ve never faced a real financial struggle or you’ve achieved enlightenment, because goddamn does financial security feel an awful lot like happiness when it’s something you’re not used to

(via tangledupinlace)

thefattestfox:

lovethyfatness:

Trust me— you need to click through and watch the trailer for this documentary. 

this really needs to happen.

nyupanties:

im aiming for the “shes a badass and cute as hell but I wouldn’t touch her without asking” look

(Source: reifaun, via iamuhura)

"Whole Foods is a point of entry into a new version of American whiteness, one which leans on a pseudo recognition of diversity through sanitized food presentation. It offers a new order of “otherness” in which the other is a pleasant-looking piece of food, totally safe, and with a pedigree. Within the Whole Foods’ bubble we are turned instantly sophisticated, and the store becomes the place where we can self-indulge in notions of cosmopolitan openness to world products and political struggles. To buy an avocado “with a background” ends up, dangerously, filling the space of our urge for political awareness. The store did the math for us, as well as all the thinking, so we can “shop with confidence” and just relax.

The whole process does something rather particular: It creates the illusion of an “independent” understanding within the larger implications of corporate intervention in defining a food’s background. In establishing a perimeter of commercial values based on social responsibility, Whole Foods depoliticizes us. Worse, for those already sinking into the hybrid life of a world without politics, it offers a parachute, a sort of immunity: “I shop here so, by extension, I know a thing or two about social awareness.”

Whole Foods unavoidably widens the gap between people who have everything and people who have nothing: How can super expensive foods that look like an invention of Edward Weston’s camera - that the majority of the world cannot afford, or would laugh about - be synonymous with social responsibility? This is truly a modern enigma.

The recent situation with quinoa, the “hot” and “trendy” new grain that we are suddenly unable to live without - and without which we are suddenly missing essential nutrients to keep us alive - is case in point. Paola Flores, filing for the AP from La Paz, Bolivia, reports that “[t]he scramble to grow more (quinoa) is prompting Bolivian farmers to abandon traditional land management practices, endangering the fragile ecosystem of the arid highlands, agronomists say.” A quinoa emergency, then, at the bulk bins. A separate exposé published in the Guardian goes even further: “[T]here is an unpalatable truth to face for those of us with a bag of quinoa in the larder. The appetite of countries such as ours for this grain has pushed up prices to such an extent that poorer people in Peru and Bolivia, for whom it was once a nourishing staple food, can no longer afford to eat it. Imported junk food is cheaper. In Lima, quinoa now costs more than chicken.” Whether we blame vegans or hipsters or the organic food movement or a lack of appropriate trade regulations, the troubling truth about quinoa represents that repetitive drama between the West and rest in which our voracious consumption depletes yet another land and another people.

Whole Foods widens the gaps, and it does so in the most subtle and displacing manner, giving us an environment (the actually sanitized, spotless physical space) that is the embodiment of an elite (yet perceived as “open,” especially through the chain’s less pricey “360” product line) that finds itself at home within a soulless, sterilized experiences. The notion of gentrification has been surpassed, attaining the space of a perennial state of mind. This is where even an apple turns into an object/jewelry of desire, not of need, or at least of normality. In that sense, Whole Foods is simply the last piece in the long, familiar chain of shifting perceptions in neo-capitalistic societies that exploded after the Second World War, in which the creation and multiplication of desires is central to the self-preservation of the system.
"
-

"Shipwrecked in Whole Foods"

- neoliberal notions of “you are what you consume”

- consumptive whiteness- the notion of the sophisticated white, western consumer

(via sextus—empiricus)

(via iamuhura)

thewomanofkleenex:

lovethyfatness:

[Series of texts by @fatnutritionist, which read: “People are mad at me because they ‘work so hard’ to be fit or lose weight. They have told me this explicitly. It implies that they think my rejecting the values they subscribe to can somehow take away the fitness they’ve worked for. That is totally delusional. If you’ve worked hard for fitness, no amount of fat people rejecting stigma can take that away. So this is obviously not actually about fitness, at all. It’s about the other thing they ‘worked hard’ for: social status. They DO think, and they know, that the social status they have worked hard to earn, through ‘fitness,’ can be devalued. It can be devalued if the hierarchy that rewards them is crushed. Crushed by people rejecting stigma. We can’t take away your fitness or whatever weight you’ve lost. But we can devalue those things by destroying fat stigma. So they are afraid of us, and for good reason. If fat people aren’t stigmatized, then there is no more thin privilege. Remember always, fat people: People are afraid of you because you have an awesome power - to destroy the hierarchy. If they were not afraid of losing their place in the hierarchy, they would not come after you so viciously.” All tweets were accompanied by the hashtag, #notyourgoodfatty]

Read the full thread of Michelle’s tweets on Storify.

Well, damn.

(via sleepydumpling)

why you don’t see a lot of “nice” SJ bloggers:

theroguefeminist:

  1. people take advantage of your niceness to exploit you as a “source” of information - bombarding you with questions/requests with no respect for your boundaries/limitations
  2. give you backhanded compliments on your niceness at the expense of less nice “unreasonable” feminists/activists/others in your group
  3. use your nice statements as arguments against less nice activists/ people in your group or to excuse/justify oppressive behavior
  4. take your niceness as an invitation to enter your space even if they have a bigoted mindset because they find your space comfortable/safe (making it less safe for you)
  5. use your niceness as the basis for creating a false “middle ground” on issues of oppression and/or painting oppressive behaviors as mere mistakes or as a “gray area”
  6. the things we are upset about or denounce are usually upheld and praised and we are working to counteract those messages and create spaces where those things are unacceptable/not upheld as ideal
  7. lastly, niceness in the oppressed is usually defined by the privileged as being docile/acquiescent- basically being complicit in or enabling oppression and activists are by definition not these things. see [x]
womanistgamergirl:

Dude.
Denny’s is calling out Coachella.
Dude.
Dude.
Denny’s dude. Wow.

womanistgamergirl:

Dude.

Denny’s is calling out Coachella.

Dude.

Dude.

Denny’s dude. Wow.

(via feminist-space)

thescentofsouls:

mirandaadria:

I’m so sick of seeing people say “feminism is about *~*equality*~*!!!”

The end goal of feminism IS equality, but feminism itself is about liberation: from white supremacy, from homophobia, from sexism, from ableism and all other forms of oppressive thought and behavior.

Without first dismantling the systems that keep us oppressed, equality is impossible.

MOTHERFUCKING WORD

(via fandomsandfeminism)

curvellas:

don’t judge people for taking selfies or posting them a lot some of us like how we look for the first time in our whole lives and that’s a big fucking deal.

(via thefatgirlblog)

fyblackwomenart:

Antler Coral Mermaid by Renee Nault